Bare Bones Biology 085 – What Can we Do?

“But what can we do?” It’s the most commonly asked question in any serious discussion about our cultural and biological problems as humans on this earth. I say serious discussion because all the “aint it awful” talk is mostly about finding reasons to not do anything. And the debates are usually about some kind of power game and, again, they’re usually an excuse not to talk about the real problem. Let me give you an example that I heard yesterday.

The debate is: “Which method can feed 7 billion humans – organic gardening or modern assembly-line methods exemplified by Monsanto?” You will find my answer in the December Peach Clubhouse newsletter that is available at www.factfictionfancy.wordpress.com. But the bottom line is, it’s a fake debate. One of the corposystem efforts to control us. It’s a fake debate about something that does not answer the important question that the corposystem does not want us to think about. I mean we could debate forever, but if we ever found the answer, it would be too late to matter. There are ALREADY MORE than 7 billion humans on this earth. The real question is why don’t we do something to stabilize our populations before it is too late? Our numbers are growing exponentially while we are debating a useless question.

To understand exponential growth you can think about how long it took the number of people to double from 3.5 billion to approximately what they are now, which is 7 billion. Then, so long as the population is growing exponentially, it will take HALF as long to double the next time, because there are twice as many people. And then half again the time after. That’s hardly enough time for humans to adjust themselves to learning how to garden, and the earth, big, and slow, also needs time to adapt to every change.

So the question is a ruse. It doesn’t matter. We already have more than 7 billion people on earth, and these people are already consuming more of food energy than the earth can give us on a continuing basis. That’s because all the food energy to feed all the people, and the ecosystem, comes from plants. And there is only so much land and water and air on earth for growing plants.

So, bad questions keep the television networks buzzing but they don’t give us useful answers. As for the question of how many people the earth can support, that question is very important, but it’s still a historical question. You can figure that out as well as I can, and when you get the vetted answer please let me know. I don’t care very much because I know the earth can not support exponential growth for very long. I mean it’s obvious. Just put four cows in a pasture with a bull. Cattle also get their food energy from plants, just as we do. Give them all the water they want, and see if they can continue in that pasture forever, year after year with no re-supply. First year five cattle, next year 9 cattle, two years later its – well you can do the math better than I can. It won’t last forever. So then let’s ask the real question. Can any form of agriculture on this earth grow enough food for an infinite number of hungry humans?

Of course not. And we don’t have all the water we want.

You don’t need math, you only need your own common sense and your love for your grandchildren to know that we should stop with the fake debates and the hand-wringing and the foolish questions and begin right now to do something useful that will help to make a better future.

Oh, yes, the question was – what can we do? Hmmmm, I’ll think about it and let you know next time.

Bare Bones Biology 085 – What Can We Do?
KEOS FM 89.1, Bryan, Texas
Audio download available later this week at
http://barebonesbiology.

Yesterday at the Peach Clubhouse

Yesterday we showed the movie “Bhutan, Gross National Happiness” as a follow-up to “Economics of Happiness.”  Both these movies describe different ways of organizing our lives around community values, but the examples they give are primarily drawn from Eastern cultures.  Another such effort, that is flourishing in the Western world, is the Transition Movement that began in England and has spread rapidly.  Rob Hopkins’ “Transition Handbook” describes the basics of organizing a community around local resources.  This book is available to read at the Peach clubhouse, and you can also find Rob Hopkins on UTube.  We also have Bill McKibben’s book “Deep Economy” in the Peachhouse library, that I think describes a year living outside the Corposystem.

But of course the real reason for the clubhouse is to gather everyone together to bring me ideas – either to add new ones to the idea-pool, or to squeeze out old ideas that I didn’t know were in there.  And yes indeed ideas abounded yesterday.

1- Lots of good input for the new series of podcasts and vidcasts.  What is life?  What do we need to live a good life?  How can we get it, right under the noses of those who are dedicated to destroy the good things we have grown together?  (If you doubt that see the last three paragraphs of Chomsky’s recent article on TomDispatch.)

2- What is the deep meaning of Miyazaki’s latest film “Carried Away?”  I’ve been trying to figure that out ever since I got the thing last year.  Miyazaki’s films always hit you with an important meaning (three of my favorites are Kiki, Grave of the Fireflies, Princess Mononoke) and now I think I have the key to Carried Away and will add it to our Tuesday night schedule, probably in June.  Carried Away is about the weakness of the Corposystem.

3- Why do I get so upset when people bring our popular “aint-it-awful” mantra into the Peach Clubhouse?  Well for one thing, I got the Peach clubhouse as a way to get away from toxic mantras, but — why so upset?    Because I want not even for one moment to support the myth that the Corposystem has the ability to keep from me the really good things that we have grown together in this country.  Ritualized chanting of anything engrains that thing into our subconscious.  We all know that.  Ritual chanting of “we can’t do – – –  “  results in — weakness — and what is worse, it offers up our personal power on the altar of the Corposystem.  This blog and this house are all about our personal responsibility and power – not weakness.

Everybody – please read “Powers of the Weak,” by Elizabeth Janeway.  You can get it for seventeen cents on Amazon.  What a bargain.    And it’s on the shelf at the Peach Clubhouse.  Chapter 11 discusses the first power of the weak.  Disbelief.  Not to believe their propaganda or our cultural acquiesence without first examining all the alternative routes toward the common good.  The second power is in community.  There are plenty more that fly along under the radar.

This afternoon (Friday) at 3 PM, in the meditation room at the Peach Clubhouse, the Brazos Insight Meditation Society will meet for meditation followed by discussion over a cup of green tea.  You don’t have to sit on the floor.  I usually don’t.  But you can.

Tomorrow, Saturday the 23rd, is work day at the Peach Clubhouse.  Goal is to get that workroom cleaned up so we can start making vidcasts.

Next movie is really quite amusing.  Tuesday April 26 at 6 pm, a Dalai Lama Renaissance, in which a group of powerful movers and shakers goes to visit His Holiness, the Dalai Lama, in Dharamsala.  The month of May will be a bit off schedule, because I am going to at least SEE the Dalai Lama in Arkansas.

So the first Tuesday night movie will be on May 3.  The title is “In the Land of the Free,” and it is quite a grim story of three people who have been kept in soliary confinement for most of 30 years each, for because they tried to stand for their civil rights.  More about that later.

Rule of Law

I met a person from Kenya the other day. We had a long talk about leadership. It’s the first time I understood why the Kenyan former leader has been behaving as he does. Very strange to us, but he apparently believes himself responsible, and leaders are responsible to lead the people. He thinks he is doing the right thing. So that is all pretty complicated and it’s not us, but don’t we also do the wrong thing for the right reasons? Sometimes? Everyone does. That’s why “right and wrong” thinking is dangerous.

In fact, I think our entire country is descending into right and wrong “aint it awful” thinking. (Or if I just noticed it, I want to go back to when I didn’t know, but I think it started when the media decided to poll everyone’s opinion on anything, whether or not there was a valid opinion to have.)

Right and wrong is a matter of emotion. If we choose to maintain a rule of law, we need to deal analytically with legal and illegal, and we need to do it with input from as many experts as possible. Right and wrong thinking, and the concept that everyone has a right to his own opinion — these ideas some people take as permission for hate crimes. Torture. War. Hate crimes, torture and war are illegal, whether or not we think we have a right to behave in that fashion, and the reason they are illegal is not because of your opinion — or mine — it’s because of the collective wisdom of several hundred years of human experience.

The whole point of rule of law is to avoid that kind of thing.

Don’t forget it is the rule of law that has made America the most powerful country in the world. And the only people who can save the rule of law is us. And we have been losing it.